This is because the Good Friday Agreement has created complex agreements between the various parties. The three areas of action of the pact have created a network of institutions to govern Northern Ireland (Strand One), bring together the heads of state and government in Northern Ireland with those of Ireland (Strand Two or North-South Cooperation) and bring together heads of state and government from across the United Kingdom and Ireland (Beach 3 or East-West). There are currently more than 140 areas in Northern Ireland-Republic of Ireland, cross-border cooperation, including health services, energy infrastructure and police work. Many experts and political leaders fear that any disruption of this cooperation could undermine confidence in the agreement and hence the basis for peace in Northern Ireland. The agreement was approved by voters across the island of Ireland in two referendums on 22 May 1998. In Northern Ireland, in the 1998 referendum on the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland, voters were asked if they supported the multi-party agreement. In the Republic of Ireland, voters were asked whether they would allow the state to sign the agreement and authorize the necessary constitutional changes (nineteen constitutional amendments from Ireland) to facilitate it. The citizens of both countries had to approve the agreement to implement it. The participants in the agreement were composed of two sovereign states (the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland), with armed forces and police forces involved in the riots. Two political parties, Sinn Féin and the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP), were linked to paramilitary organisations: the IRA (Commissional Irish Republican Army) and the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). The Ulster Democratic Party (UDP), associated with the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), had withdrawn from the talks three months earlier.

The agreement sets out a framework for the creation and number of institutions in three “parts.” 1The constitutional and political framework within which the de-decentralized government of Northern Ireland operates is that defined in the Belfast Convention of 1998 or, as it is popularly called, as it is popularly called.2The agreement imposes a single set of agreements that govern relations between the people of Northern Ireland itself, between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and thirdly , between Northern Ireland and Great Britain. As part of the agreement, the British Parliament repealed the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (which had founded Northern Ireland, divided Ireland and asserted territorial right to the whole of Ireland) and the people of the Republic of Ireland amended Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, which asserted a territorial right to Northern Ireland. The result of these referendums was a large majority in both parts of Ireland in favour of the agreement. In the Republic, 56% of the electorate voted, 94% of the vote voted in favour of the revision of the Constitution. The turnout was 81% in Northern Ireland, with 71% of the vote for the agreement. On June 5, 2008, Paisley retired as Prime Minister and DUP leadership and was replaced by Peter Robinson in both positions. In the third Northern Ireland Executive, the political relationship between Robinson and McGuinness was the same as before between Paisley and McGuinness. After being the first minister to resign on January 11, 2016, Robinson was replaced by Arlene Foster. After McGuinness resigned on January 9, 2017, Stormont`s decentralized government collapsed as the deal is required if no new leaders are appointed.